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Keiko Sano’s Dissertation Defense and Public Lecture

December 11 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Attend PhD candidate Keiko Sano’s oral dissertation defense and public lecture on Dec. 11, from 3:30-4:30 pm in room 202A.

Title: Foreign-born doctoral-level counselor supervisors’ use of supervision theories/models

Committee members:

Abstract: Learning about supervision theories/models is part of counselor educator and supervisor training; however, the number of available empirical studies exploring supervisors’ use of supervision theories/models is limited. Diversity and globalization in the field of counseling and doctoral students in the counselor education and supervision program have been increased in the last two decades; however, multicultural issues in supervision literature often focus on the supervisors’ multicultural competency by assuming that supervisors are white Americans and supervisees are foreign-born or from diverse background. The present study was designed to fill gaps in the current literature by focusing on foreign-born racially/ethnically diverse doctoral-level supervisors’ experience in clinical supervision in order to assess the cultural sensitivity of available supervision theories/models.

The present study was conducted to answer two research questions: (a) How do foreign-born supervisors use supervision theories/models with their white American-born supervisees? and (b) What do those foreign-born supervisors experience in supervision? A qualitative constructivist grounded theory methodology was utilized, and data were collected in two levels: an initial written survey to construct interview questions (N=30) and individual semi-structured interviews (N=12). The results suggested three significant findings in the foreign-born supervisors’ use of supervision theories/models and experiences. First, foreign-born supervisors take the supervisee-centered approach regardless of their supervision theories. Second, supervision theories/models offer a framework to facilitate supervision sessions, tools to build supervisory relationship, and roles to fill cultural gaps in supervision. Third, foreign-born supervisors use their supervisees’ perspectives toward themselves to evaluate supervisor relationships, effectiveness of the supervision theories/models. and their competency as a supervisor. Implications for supervision training and development of culturally sensitive supervision theories/models, recommendations for future research, and this researcher’s biases in studying foreign-born supervisors were discussed.

Committee members:
Dr. Ned Farley, PhD
Dr. Colin Ward, PhD
Dr. Mariaimeé Gonzalez, PhD

Details

Date:
December 11
Time:
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Venue

Antioch University Seattle
2400 3rd Ave #200
Seattle, WA 98121 United States
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Phone:
(888) 268-4477