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Jude Bergkamp

Antioch University Seattle

Dr. Bergkamp is currently core faculty in the Clinical Psychology Department at Antioch University Seattle and clinical faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. He is currently licensed as a psychologist and mental health counselor in Washington State. He earned both a master’s degree in family therapy and a doctorate degree in clinical psychology from Antioch University Seattle. He was trained in forensic and neuropsychology and has worked in the Washington State Department of Corrections, and most recently, as a forensic evaluator at the Center for Forensic Services at Western State Hospital. In addition, Dr. Bergkamp was a research fellow with the American Psychological Association studying cultural competency and minority health disparities.

Dr. Bergkamp is currently involved in ongoing research regarding cultural competency training both in clinical psychology education as well as consultation with state agencies on implementing cultural competency in large organizations. He is also fostering a project in collaboration with Puget Sound Law to provide exceptional hardship evaluations for immigrants facing deportation.

Dr. Bergkamp’s other research interests include qualitative methodology, tele-health implementation, the formation of identity in social media, and the use of “Big Data” derived from Internet usage trends.

Educational History

Dr. Bergkamp’s undergraduate education focused on violence, addiction, human sexuality, and Buddhist studies from The Evergreen State College. He then earned a M.A. in the Antioch Seattle Couple & Family Therapy Program. After years of private practice, he completed the Psy.D. program from Antioch University Seattle in 2010. He has completed various internships related to forensic and neuropsychology, with major rotations with the Washington State Department of Corrections. In addition, Dr. Bergkamp received additional education in Grounded Theory (qualitative methodology) from Dr. Barney Glaser. His dissertation is entitled the Paradox of Multicultural Training and identified pitfalls and recommendations for cultural competency in clinical psychology.

Teaching Statement

A statement of teaching philosophy requires both anchoring principles and flexible boundaries. My anchoring principles include epistemological pluralism, as well as experiential, life-long, and collaborative learning. These principles support my growing edge as an instructor, and my ability to adapt to the evolving process of both student learning and environmental change. The principle of epistemological pluralism asserts multiple approaches are required to obtain a more accurate glimpse of the truth. This principle lays the foundation for notions of interdisciplinary study, the merging of deductive/inductive reasoning (quantitative/qualitative methods), and the utilization of all aspects of the student in the learning process. The learning process is more than the simple consumption, retention, and application of knowledge. The student is more than simply the “tabula rasa” of which the knowledge is given. The quality of learning relies on experience and perception, as well as rote fact.

The principle of experiential learning emphasizes the practice of awareness, reflection, and experimentation. All of which are the trademarks of a competent scientist. This is at the core of Antioch’s academic pursuit to merge theory and practice, as well as the Boulder model of practitioner/scholar. One of the goals of an experiential approach is to inspire life-long learning, in which the pursuit of knowledge results in greater dividends than simply the attainment of knowledge. A benchmark of successful education is the student’s ever-evolving study into their field, and appreciation of study for its own sake. Life-long learning continuous forges the professional and prevents stagnation. Following the aforementioned principles, and stemming from Vygotsky’s learning theory, collaborative learning emphasizes the power of social exchange. The exchange of students and faculty, both in and out of the classroom, brings breadth and depth to learning. For Antiochians, many of whom are adult learners, this collaborative approach is at the core of the Doctoral program. The challenge for Antioch faculty is as much to access the expertise and experience of each student as it is to disseminate knowledge.

The aspiration of my teaching philosophy is to combine these principles into a learning experience that the student is seeking and, ultimately, deserves. My goal is to facilitate education that not only prepares the student for a professional career, but also can bring meaning and transformation to his or her life as a whole.

Dr. Bergkamp currently leads two active research groups. The first is the Social Privilege research group. The second is the Forensic research group. Both are active in producing presentations, manuscripts, and dissertations.

Dr. Bergkamp’s other research interests include applying a developmental lens to the concept of social privilege, implicit bias in correctional settings, virtual qualitative methodology, tele-health implementation, the formation of identity in social media, and the use of “Big Data” derived from Internet usage trends. Regarding methodology, Dr. Bergkamp specializes in Grounded Theory, a qualitative method for inductive theory development rooted in data.

Bergkamp, J. & Ermann, K. (In Press). Biracial and multiracial individuals. In the Wiley Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Difference, Volume IV: Clinical, Applied, and Cross-Cultural Research. Wiley-Blackwell Publishing.

Bergkamp, J. & Ponsford, M. (In Press). Cultural encapsulation. In the Wiley Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Difference, Volume IV: Clinical, Applied, and Cross-Cultural Research. Wiley-Blackwell Publishing.

Bergkamp, J., Olson, L., & Martin, A. (2019). On Social Justice and the Development of Social Privilege. In Moritsugu, J., Vera, E., Wong, F., and Duffy, K. (2019). Community Psychology, 6th Edition. Routlege/Taylor Francis.

Bergkamp, J., Azlin, C., Sakuma, M., & Heusler, W. (2019). Disruptive Social Justice Curriculum: How it looks in the classroom, the research lab, and in clinical training. The National Council of Schools of Professional Psychology.

Bergkamp, J. (2018). Precedent case-law in Washington State: A call for cultural competency in forensic evaluations. The American Psychology-Law Society Graduate Student Symposium.

Bergkamp, J. & Agassiz, K. (2018). Cultural competency in forensic practice: Bridging the Divide. The American Psychology & Law Society Expert Opinion, Quarterly Newsletter.

Bergkamp, J. & Curtis, S. (2018). Case Law and Cultural Competency in Competency to Stand Trial Evaluations: Pragmatic Application. The American Psychology-Law Conference, APA Division 41.

Bergkamp, J. & Thomas, L. (2018). Social Privilege in Clinical Psychology. The Deschutes Psychological Association Symposium.

McGee, S., Kinnamon, C., Nipper, A., Wells, K. & Bergkamp. J. (2018). Western Clinical Psychology Student’s Exploration of Cultural Immersion: The Intersection of Tibetan Buddhism and Psychology. The American Psychological Association Convention; Division 36.

Thomas, L., & Bergkamp, J. (2018). Introductory Social Pedagogy in a Clinical PsychologyTraining Program. The Race & Pedagogy Conference at the University of Puget Sound.

Thomas, L., Martin, A., Bergkamp, J., Babcock, M. (2018). Exploring the Path of Least Resistance: A Grounded Theory Study of Privilege Awareness and Implications for Education. The American Psychological Association Convention; Division 2.

Thomas, L., Martin, A., Bergkamp, J., Babcock, M. (2018). Exploring the Path of Least Resistance; A Ground Theory Study of Privilege Awareness. The American
Psychological Association Convention; Division 9.

Bergkamp, J. (2017). Avatar Identity Development: What Video Games tell us about Ourselves. The American Psychological Association Convention; Division 46.

Bergkamp, J. (2017). Cultural Competency in Forensic Evaluations: Case Studies of the Jinni. The University of Washington Post-Doctoral Fellowship Seminar.

Bergkamp, J. & Hendrickson, R. (2016). Malingering Misperceptions; Clinical Application of Forensic Malingering. The Washington State Behavioral Healthcare Conference.

Bergkamp, J. (2015). Virtual Identity Development; Videos games and the Self. The Qualitative Quorum of the University of Washington Office of Research.

Bergkamp, J. (2015). Classic Glasserian Grounded Theory. The Qualitative Quorum of the University of Washington Office of Research.

Bergkamp, J. (2015). Cultural Competency Guidelines for Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA). The King Count Family Law Center.

Bergkamp, J. & Means, J. (2015). Principles of Risk and Threat Assessment: Gun Violence. Seattle Children’s Hospital for the Washington State Council of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

Bergkamp, J. & Curtis, S. (2014). Cultural Competency in Forensic Private Practice: From Aspiration to Reality. The Washington State Psychological Association.

Bergkamp, J. & Bjorling, E. (2012). Avatar Development in Second Life; Implications for First Life. The Giving Voice to Experience Conference at Seattle University.

Bergkamp, J. & Hendrickson, R. (2012). Forensic Evaluations; What Happens After CSI.The Washington State Behavioral Healthcare Conference.

Bergkamp, J., Nelson, J., Cooke, T., & Tien, L. (2012). Does Doctoral-level Cultural Competency Curriculum Work & How? The Washington State Psychological Association.

Bergkamp, J. (2012). Cultural Competency in Professional Psychology Training; What Works and What Doesn’t. The Western State Hospital Internship Seminar Series.

  • Diversity Scholarship Award, National Counsel of Schools of Professional Psychology 2018
  • Distinguished Alumni of the Year Award Antioch University Seattle 2018
  • Minority Research Fellowship
  • American Psychological Association, Division 45 2010
    • One of nine national fellows tasked with presenting research on minority health disparities, mental health parity, health care reform, and the role of psychology in public policy
    • Advocacy at a state and federal level
    • Pipeline relationship with national and federal funding agencies such as the National Institute for Health, The Robert Woods, and William T. Grant Foundations

Dr. Bergkamp is core faculty in the Clinical Psychology Department and program chair of the doctoral program at Antioch University Seattle, as well as clinical faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. He has taught graduate courses in qualitative research methodology, psychological assessment, and cultural competency. He is licensed as a psychologist and mental health counselor in Washington State. He was trained in forensic and neuropsychology and has worked in the Washington State Department of Corrections, and as a forensic evaluator at the Center for Forensic Services at Western State Hospital. As Program Chair, Dr. Bergkamp and his team of faculty recently achieved APA accreditation for a 5-year term.

Dr. Bergkamp keeps an active clinical practice through his role as a Forensic Evaluator with the Washington State Office of Forensic Mental Health, specializing in pre-trial criminal evaluations. He is also Clinical Faculty in the University of Washington School of Psychiatry where he teaches classes on forensic cultural competency and supervises residents. Dr. Bergkamp is currently serving on the Executive Committee of the National Council of Schools of Professional Psychology (NCSPP), where he chairs the Diversity Committee. He is also a liaison member of Committee on Ethic Minority Affairs of the American Psychological Association (APA).

jude bergkamp

Chair, Core Faculty, PsyD Program,

School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy

CONTACT INFORMATION

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