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Lisabeth Willey, PhD

Antioch University New England

I am a conservation biologist with a focus on vertebrate ecology, and I enjoy working with students and collaborators to employ varied field sampling and modeling techniques to tackle applied ecological questions, both inside and beyond the classroom. My teaching is influenced by a range of research and collaborative projects that emphasize finding solutions to challenges associated with biodiversity loss, habitat loss and fragmentation, and rare species and ecosystem conservation.

Recently, I’ve worked with university, agency, non-profit, and student collaborators to undertake regional, rare wildlife conservation planning efforts in the northeastern U.S., which include field sampling programs to help inform empirically-derived models that can then be used to inform conservation and management decisions at multiple spatial and temporal scales. With a background in Environmental Engineering, I enjoy bringing a quantitative lens to such problems, but I’m most excited about engaging partners from across disciplines to plan and implement conservation actions. Much of my work is focused in New England, but I explore ecological questions across a range of environmental conditions, from alpine systems in Québec and Newfoundland and Labrador, to tropical forest systems on the Yucatán peninsula, with a special focus on evaluating the effects of landscape composition, structure, and change on those systems.

I’m thrilled to be part of AUNE’s interdisciplinary and collaborative Environmental Studies Department where I have the opportunity to engage and learn with students and colleagues from within and beyond the Department and to try to tackle these and other challenging environmental problems inside and outside the classroom. Ecological and environmental systems are so complex that the most effective way to find solutions is to work together, building capacity with a vast array of skills, backgrounds, and perspectives. If you have an interest in collaborating on a project, please get in touch!

Educational History

  • PhD, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Massachusetts Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • BS, Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

I’m interested in a range of varied ecological questions with a particular emphasis on characterizing landscape patterns and evaluating how changes in landscape composition and structure affects long-lived systems. I explore these questions through two disparate systems: freshwater turtles and alpine tundra. I work with students and colleagues to design ecological studies and develop empirically-derived models at multiple spatial and temporal scales to inform broad-scale, collaborative conservation planning initiatives, while simultaneously working with collaborators and stakeholders to implements those plans.

Ongoing Projects

Conservation Planning for Blanding’s Turtles in the Northeast U.S.

Northeast Blanding’s Turtle Working Group. The Blanding’s turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) is a long-lived, semi-terrestrial turtle species of conservation concern throughout its range. Several isolated, disjunct populations occur in the northeastern U.S. These populations are limited in extent and occur in some of the most heavily developed parts of the region. Blanding’s turtles are listed as “Endangered” by the IUCN and a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in all five Northeast states in which they occur. Because they require diverse, interconnected wetland and terrestrial habitats across large areas, they are an important umbrella species, and conservation actions targeting Blanding’s turtle likely result in the protection of many other species. As part of a regional conservation planning effort (sponsored by the USFWS Competitive SWG program), the Northeast Blanding’s Turtle Working Group developed and implemented a 5-state standardized monitoring protocol and used results to rank sites across the region, develop a “conservation network” of high priority Blanding’s turtle sites, and make management recommendations at the regional and site level. We are currently working to implement that plan. Learn more at www.blandingsturtle.org

Collaborators: Michael Jones and Paul Sievert, Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA; Michael Marchand, New Hampshire Fish and Game Department; Jonathan Regosin and Lori Erb, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife; Derek Yorks, Phillip deMaynadier, and Jonathan Mays, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Department; Angelena M. Ross, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation; Kathy Gipe and Chris Urban, Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission; Glenn Johnson, State University of New York Potsdam; Bryan Windmiller, Hyla Ecological Services; Mark Grgurovic, Swampwalkers Wetland Ecosystem Specialists; Stephanie Koch, Alison Whitlock, and Anthony Tur, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Conservation Planning and Implementation for the Wood Turtle (Glyptemys insculpta) and Associated Riparian Species of Greatest Conservation Need from Maine to Virginia

Wood Turtle Council. The wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta LeConte) occurs in riverine, riparian, and terrestrial habitats from Nova Scotia to Virginia and west to Minnesota. Recent studies in the northeast region and adjacent Canada have reported population declines as well as elevated adult mortality caused by roadkill and agricultural machinery. Wood turtles have been identified by the Northeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (NEPARC) as a species of regional conservation concern because it is listed in >75% of northeast Wildlife Action Plans, and it is listed as Endangered by the IUCN. Scientists, conservationists, and agency representatives from 13 northeastern states are partnering to identify, protect, manage, and enhance functional riparian and riverine habitats for wildlife throughout the region. Learn more at www.woodturtlecouncil.org

Partners: Mike Jones (UMass Amherst), Thomas Akre (SCBI), Paul Sievert (UMass Amherst), Phillip deMaynadier, Derek Yorks, and Jonathan Mays (Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife); Nancy Sferra (Nature Conservancy of Maine); Michael Marchand (New Hampshire Fish and Game Department); Steve Parren, (Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife); Angelena Ross (New York State Department of Environmental Conservation); Lori Erb, Jon Regosin and Jake Kubel (Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife); Dave Golden and Brian Zarate (New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife); Ed Thompson and Scott Smith (Maryland Department of Natural Resources); J.D. Kleopfer (Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries); Leighlan Prout (US Forest Service, White Mountain National Forest); Dr. Raymond Saumure (Springs Preserve); Dr. Barry Wicklow (St. Anselm College); Jim Andrews (Vermont Amphibian and Reptile Atlas); Mark Powell (VT River Conservancy); Dr. Glenn Johnson (SUNY Potsdam); Dr. Russell Burke (Hofstra University); Dr. Kurt Buhlmann (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory); Steve Krichbaum (Wild Virginia); and Bradley W. Compton (UMass Amherst)

Community-based ecological research and conservation of the Yucatán box turtle in Yucatán, Campeche, and Quintana Roo

The Yucatán box turtle (Terrapene carolina yucatana) is one of the southernmost, disjunct, and isolated representatives of the wide-ranging North American genus Terrapene (New World box turtles). The status of the Yucatán box turtle is believed to be more precarious than most other taxa in the T. carolina complex, because it is heavily collected as a pet, food source, and medicinal item (for the treatment of asthma) across much of its native range. Prescribed burns, deforestation, and habitat loss are additional pressures facing the subspecies, but little is known about its distribution, status, habitat preferences, or behavior. We have been developing long-term partnerships with scientists, land managers, local business owners, residents, teachers, and ranchers across Yucatán to 1) assess the distribution and relative abundance of Yucatán box turtles through surveys and interviews, 2) evaluate movement and behavioral patterns using radio-telemetry, 3) develop methods of population assessment and prioritization, and 4) gradually develop a realistic and collaborative conservation strategy with conservation partners and small villages in the center of the range.

Collaborators: Michael T. Jones, Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Thomas S.B. Akre and Erika Gonzalez Smithsonian Mason School of Conservation, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Front Royal, VA; Rodrigo Macip-Rios, University of Puebla, Puebla, Mexico

Ecology and Management of the Gulf Coast Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina major)

The Gulf Coast box turtle (Terrapene carolina major Agassiz, 1857) is a medium-sized, semi-terrestrial emydid turtle native to portions of the north shore of the Gulf of Mexico from the Panhandle region of Florida to eastern Texas. The T. c. major lineage is considered to be a modern form of the Pleistocene T. c. putnami, which ranged the Gulf Coastal Plain and reached a carapace length of 300 mm, and most researchers conclude that the major lineage is an evolutionarily significant one because of the retained putnami traits (such as the plesiomorphic axillary scute and large body size) and semi-aquatic habitat preference. The typical form of the Gulf Coast box turtle is restricted to outlying coastal areas and islands between Gulf County, Florida, and Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, and relatively little is known of rangewide abundance, local population densities, and individual responses to disturbances such as prescribed burns, which are conducted in slash pine plantation at intervals as frequent as every three years. We have initiated a long-term study of box turtle populations along the Apalachicola River in Gulf, Franklin, and Liberty Counties, Florida, and on offshore islands near the mouth of the Apalachicola River to evaluate the effects of landcover and disturbance frequency on the population structure of Gulf Coast box turtles.

Collaborators: Michael T. Jones, Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA; Dale R. Jackson, Florida Natural Areas Inventory, Tallahassee, FL 32303 USA; Ross Kiester, Turtle Conservancy. Evaluating Recovery of the Northern Red-bellied Cooter The Massachusetts population of the Northern Red-bellied Cooter (Pseudemys rubriventris), formerly Plymouth Red-bellied Cooter, was listed as an endangered species on April 2, 1980. At the time of listing, cooters in Massachusetts were known from only 12 ponds in Plymouth County, MA, with an estimated population of approximately 200 individuals. To increase survival and recruitment by reducing predation rates, the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (MADFW), in partnership with the USFWS, began a headstarting program (raising wild hatchlings in captivity for 9 months) that continues today. With UMass Amherst, MADFW, and the USFWS, we are assessing the effectiveness of the head start program, estimating current distribution and population status of the species, and identifying management actions necessary to promote species recovery. Collaborators: Jon Regosin and Thomas French, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife; Stephanie Koch and Anthony Tur, US Fish and Wildlife Service; Michael T. Jones and Paul R. Sievert, Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

Conservation of Alpine Biodiversity in Eastern North America

With Beyond Ktaadn (www.beyondktaadn.org), a non-profit organization that is committed to the conservation of alpine biodiversity in eastern North America through applied research, educational programs, and strong regional partnerships, I am collaborating with scientists throughout New England, Quebec, and Newfoundland and Labrador, to develop and institute studies and monitoring programs for plants and wildlife species on high elevation, treeless mountain systems across the region. Our work in the region led to a collaborative book, the Eastern Alpine Guide, published in 2012, and we are currently involved in a number of collaborative projects throughout the eastern alpine region which include botanical surveys, mammal community sampling via camera traps, amphibian and avian sampling using acoustic recorders, invertebrate sampling, phylogenetic analyses of plant species, rare plant species recovery efforts, and multi-scale habitat modeling on mountains in New Hampshire, Maine, Québec, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Beyond Ktaadn assisted with a GLORIA installation in the Gaspé region of Québec in 2011, a second installation in the White Mountain National Forest in 2014, and began an installation in the Monts Groulx (Uapishka) in 2010, which we plan to complete in 2015 or 2016. Beyond Ktaadn has a long-term commitment to alpine research and conservation, and as part of that plans to continue to collaborate with partner organizations to institute a network of long-term, low impact alpine biodiversity monitoring studies throughout the region in order to assess the effects of climate and landscape change on these rare and sensitive ecosystem types.

Partners and supporters in these efforts include: Bob Capers, University of Connecticut; Guillaume Fortin, Université de Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada; Mike Jones, Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit at UMass Amherst, Dan Sperduto, USFS; Doug Weihrauch, Appalachian Mountain Club; Daniel Germain is a Université of Québec in Montréal; Paul Wylezol, International Appalachian Trail Newfoundland; Québec Ministère du Développement durable, de l’Environnement et des Parcs, Québec Ministère des Ressources naturelles et de la Faune, the U.S. Forest Service White Mountain National Forest; the Global Observation Research in Alpine Environments (GLORIA) Network; the Walden Woods Project; and the Waterman Fund.

Related Links

Beyond Ktaadn, a 501(c)3 organization devoted to the conservation of alpine biodiversity in eastern North America. 

Northeast Blanding’s Turtle Working Group, a regional partnership of state wildlife agencies, universities, non-profit organizations, and independent scientists focused on the conservation of Blanding’s turtles in the Northeast. 

http://www.northeastturtles.org/  A clearinghouse for regional conservation projects for Blanding’s, Spotted, Wood, and Box turtles

http://www.americanturtles.org/  American Turtle Observatory, a 501(c)3 focused on the conservation of North America’s freshwater turtles and the landscapes upon which they rely.

 

Refereed Journal Articles:

  • Meck, J.R., M.T. Jones, L.L. Willey, and J.D. Mays. In press. Autecological study of Gulf Coast Box Turtles (Terrapene carolina major) in the Florida panhandle reveals unique spatial and behavioral characteristics.  Herpetological Conservation and Biology.
  • Jones, M.T. and L.L. Willey. 2020. Annual movement and dispersal in adult wood turtles (Glyptemys insculpta). Herpetology Review 51(2) 208–211.
  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, D.T. Yorks, P.D. Hazelton, and S. L. Johnson. 2020. Passive transport of Eastern Elliptio (Elliptio complanata) by freshwater turtles in New England. Canadian Field-Naturalist 134(1): 56–59.
  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, A.M. Richmond, and P.R. Sievert. 2019. Reassessment of Agassiz’s Wood Turtle Collections Reveals Significant Change in Body Size and Growth Rates. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 14(1):41–50.
  • McGarigal, K., E. Plunkett, L.L. Willey; B. Compton, W. DeLuca, and J. Grand. 2018. Modeling non-stationary urban growth: The SPRAWL model and the ecological impacts of development. Landscape and Urban Planning 177: 178-190.
  • Macip-Rios, R., M.T. Jones, L.L. Willey, S.B. Akre, E. Gonzalez-Akre, L.F. Diaz-Gamboa. 2018. Population Structure and Natural History of Creaser’s Mud Turtle (Kinosternon creaseri) in Central Yucatán. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 13(2):366–372.
  • Sperduto, D.D. M.T. Jones, and L.L. Willey. 2018. Decline of Sibbaldia procumbens (Rosaceae) on Mount Washington, White Mountains, NH, USA. Rhodora 120 (981):65-75.
  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, and N.D. Charney. 2016. Box Turtles (Terrapene carolina bauri) on ancient, anthropogenic shell work islands in the Ten Thousand Islands mangrove estuary, Florida, USA. Journal of Herpetology 50(1): 94-101. http://journalofherpetology.org/doi/abs/10.1670/13-149
  • Erb, L. A., L.L. Willey, L.M. Johnson, J.E. Hines, and R.P. Cook. 2015. Detecting long‐term population trends for an elusive reptile species. The Journal of Wildlife Management 79(7): 1062-1071.
  • Kiester, A.R. and L.L. Willey. 2015. Terrapene carolina (Linnaeus 1758) – Eastern Box Turtle, Common Box Turtle. In: Rhodin, A.G.J., Pritchard, P.C.H., van Dijk, P.P., Saumure, R.A., Buhlmann, K.A., Iverson, J.B., and Mittermeier, R.A. (Eds.). Conservation Biology of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises: A Compilation Project of the IUCN/SSC Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group. Chelonian Research Monographs 5(8):085.1–25, doi:10.3854/crm.5.085.carolina.v1.2015.
  • Willey, L.L., and P. Sievert. 2012. Notes on the nesting ecology of the eastern box turtle in central Massachusetts. Northeastern Naturalist 19(3):361-372.
  • Willey, L.L., and M.T. Jones. 2012. Site characteristics of Sibbaldia procumbens (Rosaceae) on the Uapishka Plateau (Monts Groulx), Québec, with notes on the alpine flora. Rhodora 114(957)21-30.

Notes:

  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, and R.M. Riós. 2017. Natural History: Pseudemys nelsoni, Florida Redbellied Cooter. Herpetological Review 48(2)426-427.
  • Jones, M.T., and L.L. Willey. 2011. Geographic Distribution: Trachemys stejnegeri, Central Antillean Slider. Herpetological Review 42(4). (Confirmed range extension to Isla de Culebra, Puerto Rico).
  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, and N.D. Charney. 2011. Geographic Distribution: Gopherus polyphemus, Gopher Tortoise. Herpetological Review 42(3). (Range extension 30 km eastward to atypical habitat on offshore shell mounds).
  • Jones, M.T., and L.L. Willey. 2011. Geographic Distribution: Ambystoma maculatum, Spotted Salamander. Herpetological Review 42(3)104-105. (Range extension 150 km northward into central Québec).
  • Willey, L.L., and M.T. Jones. 2010. Natural History Note: Plethodon cinereus, Red-backed Salamander, Maximum elevation. Herpetological Review 41(2):190. (Unusual high-elevation occurrence on Katahdin, ME).

Books:

  • Jones, M.T., and L.L. Willey (Eds.). 2018. Eastern Alpine Guide: Natural History and Conservation of Mountain Tundra East of the Rockies. University Press of New England; Lebanon, NH. 348 pp.

 Selected Technical Reports:

  • Willey, L.L. M. Jones, C. Cogbill, N. Charney, B. Engstrem, and M. Peters, 2019. Conserving Alpine Vegetation along the Crawford Path during its 200th Anniversary. 2019. Beyond Ktaadn. Technical report submitted to US Forest Service, March 2019.
  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, J.D. Mays, and C.K. Dodd, Jr. 2018. Florida Box Turtles on Egmont Key: A Reassessment End of year report 2018. American Turtle Observatory and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. December 2018. 28 pp.
  • Jones, M.T., H. P. Roberts, and L.L. Willey (Eds.). 2018. Conservation Plan for the Wood Turtle in the Northeastern United States. Report to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 205 pp.
  • Jones, M.T., J. Regosin, N. Gualco, L. L. Willey, and Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program (NHESP). 2017. Status and Conservation of the Northern Red-bellied Cooter in Massachusetts. Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife; Westborough, MA. 109 pp. May 2017.
  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, J.D. Mays, and C.K. Dodd, Jr. 2017. Florida Box Turtles on Egmont Key: A Preliminary Reassessment. American Turtle Observatory and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. April 2017.
  • Jones, M.T., and L.L. Willey.  Distribution, Population Structure, and Movement Patterns of Florida box turtles (Terrapene carolina bauri) in the Northern Ten Thousand Islands, Florida. Summary Report 2010-2016. 2017. American Turtle Observatory, New Salem, MA. 21pp.
  • Meck, J., M.T. Jones, L.L. Willey, R. Kiester, J.D. Mays, and B.Smith. 2016. Ecology of the Gulf Coast Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina major) in the Apalachicola River Floodplain. Interim Report—2016 A Report Prepared for: U.S. Forest Service, Apalachicola National Forest, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Apalachicola River Wildlife and Environmental Area Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. American Turtle Observatory, New Salem, MA. 8 pp. December 2016.
  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, R. Kiester, J. Mays, B. Smith, and J. Meck. 2016. Ecology of the Gulf Coast Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina major) in the Apalachicola River Floodplain. Summary Report (2014–2015) and Proposal for Phase II (Radiotelemetry).A Report Prepared for: U.S. Forest Service, Apalachicola National Forest, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Apalachicola River Wildlife and Environmental Area Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. January 2016.
  • Jones, J. Regosin, L. Willey, T. French, P. Sievert, N. Gualco 2016. Status of the Northern Red-Bellied Cooter (Pseudemys rubriventris) in Plymouth, Massachusetts 2015 Report. A Technical Report prepared for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. January 30, 2016.
  • Willey, L.L., M.T. Jones, et al. 2014. Conservation Plan for Blanding’s Turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) in the Northeastern United States. Report to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. http://blandingsturtle.org
  • Jones, M.T., L. Willey, P. Sievert, T.S.B. Akre, et al. 2014. Status and Conservation of the Wood Turtle (Glyptemys insculpta) in the Northeastern United States. Report to the Regional Conservation Needs Program of NEAFWA and WMI. http://northeastturtles.org/NE/RCN2011-02.pdf
  • Charney, N.D., L.L. Willey, and M.T. Jones. 2014. Prioritizing habitats for regulatory review: Blanding’s and wood turtle in Massachusetts. A report and conceptual framework prepared for the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program; West Boylston, MA.
  • Johnson, L.M., L.L. Willey, M.T. Jones, and F. Sangermano. 2012. Predicting core reproductive habitat for wolverine (Gulo gulo) in Québec, Canada using a GIS–based deductive modeling approach. Technical report prepared for Province du Québec. Beyond Ktaadn; New Salem, MA. 28 pp.
  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, and B. Compton. 2010. Wood turtle monitoring in the Upper Kennebec Watershed, Maine. Technical report submitted to the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife. 22 pp.
  • Eiseman, C., M.T. Jones, L.L. Willey, and Q. Quinlan. 2010. Distribution and habitat requirements of large-leaved goldenrod (Solidago macrophylla) in Massachusetts. Technical report prepared for the MNHESP; Westborough, MA. 11 pp.
  • Willey, L.L., L. Johnson, L. Erb. 2010. Eastern box turtle monitoring in Massachusetts, 2010 Report. Technical Report prepared for the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program (MNHESP); Westborough, MA. 20pp.

Non-technical Articles:

  • Jones, M.T., and L.L. Willey. 2012. Ten peaks in the great Eastern Alpine Zone: A list of great mountains expands old ideas of boundaries. Appalachia 63(1)12-32. (cover feature in Expanding our vision Northward).
  • Willey, L.L. 2011. Eastern Box Turtles in Massachusetts. Massachusetts Wildlife. June 2011.

Invited Lectures, Presentations, and Panel Discussions

  • Willey, L.L. 2020. Keynote address: Leveraging 20 Years of NEPARC Partnerships: Where from Here for Turtle Conservation? Northeast Partners for Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (NEPARC) Annual Meeting. Stockton University, NJ. 7/18/19
  • Willey, L.L., M.T. Jones, M. Marchand, P.R. Sievert. 2018. Conservation Planning for Blanding’s Turtles in the Northeastern U.S. Invited Presentation, The Wildlife Society Annual Meeting, Cleveland, OH. 10/18.
  • Jones, M.T., and L.L. Willey. 2015. Eastern alpine ecology. Invited lecture, New England Wildflower Society; Framingham, MA. 2/25/15
  • Jones, M.T., and L.L. Willey. 2015. Eastern alpine ecology. Invited lecture, Manhattan Chapter of the American Rock Garden Society; New York City, NY. 2/23/15
  • Willey, L.L., and M. T. Jones. Wood Turtle Ecology and Conservation. Keene State University, Keene, NH. 2/26/15. Sponsored by the Harris Center.
  • Wilderness Ethics Panel Discussion. Led by Peter Palmiotto, Antioch University New England, Keene, NH. 3/5/15
  • Jones, M.T., and L.L. Willey. 2013. Eastern Alpine Guide: A Vision for Collaborative Conservation. Invited keynote presentation, Northeastern U.S. Alpine Stewardship Conference, Hancock, NH. 11/3/13
  • Plunkett, E., L. Willey, K. McGarigal, B. Compton, W. Deluca, and J. Grand.  2012. Assessment of landscape changes in the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative: Urban Growth Modeling. Chesapeake Bay Modeling Symposium. Annapolis, MD. 5/22/12
  • Willey, L.L. and M.T. Jones. Beyond Ktaadn: Alpine conservation in eastern North America. Stewardship lecture presented at Athol Bird and Nature Club. 1/19/11

Selected Conference Presentations

  • Willey, L.L and the Eastern Spotted Turtle Working Group. 2020. Conservation Planning for Spotted Turtle in the Eastern U.S. Spotted, Blanding’s, and Wood Turtle Conservation Symposium. Berkeley Springs, WV. November 2019.
  • Willey L.L., M.T. Jones, H.P Roberts, and J. Milam. 2019. Long-term Changes in Population Structure and Space use in three Spotted Turtle Populations in Massachusetts: Revisiting Graham and Milam and Melvin. 17th Annual Symposium on the Conservation and Biology of Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles; Tucson, AZ. August 2019.
  • Willey, L.L., M.T. Jones, E. G. Nahuat, T.S.B. Akre, E. Gonzalez, R Macip-Rios, L. Diaz Gamboa. 2019. Ecology of the Yucatán Box Turtle (Terrapene yucatana) in Yucatán. Box Turtle Conservation Workshop; Haw River State Park, North Carolina. May 2019.
  • Willey, L.L. 2019. Regional Conservation Planning for Freshwater Turtle RSGCN of the Northeast. Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference hosted by the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (NEAFWA). Groton, Connecticut. April 2019.
  • Regosin, J., T.W. French, M.T. Jones, L.L. Willey, N. Gualco, N. Cardona, P.R. Sievert, S. Koch. 2015. Status of the Northern Red-bellied Cooter (Pseudemys rubriventris) in Plymouth County, Massachusetts. 13th Annual Symposium on the Conservation and Biology of Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles; Tucson, AZ. 8/2015.
  • Marchand, M., L. Willey, M. Jones, P. Sievert, et al. 2015. Identifying priority focus areas for Blanding’s turtle in the northeast. Invited presentation in PARC Symposium: Identifying Priority Areas for Herpetofauna Conservation. 58th annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles; Lawrence, KS. 8/2015
  • Marchand, M., L. Willey, M. Jones, P. Sievert, et al. 2014. Blanding’s turtle conservation in the northeast: an example of regional partnerships for rare reptiles and amphibians. Northeast Partners for Amphibian and Reptile Conservation; Salamanca, NY. 8/2014
  • Jones, M.T., L.L. Willey, T.S.B. Akre, R. Macip Rios, et al. 2014. Biology and conservation of the Yucatán box turtle. 12th Annual Symposium on the Conservation and Biology of Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles; Orlando, FL. 8/7/14
  • Willey, L.L., M. T. Jones, and P. R. Sievert, M. Marchand, J. Regosin, L. Erb, et al. 2014. Effects of anthropogenic landscape change on characteristics of Blanding’s turtle populations, with implications for regional conservation. Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference hosted NEAFWA; Portland, ME. 4/14/14
Lisabeth Willey headshot

Core Faculty,

Environmental Studies & Sustainability

CONTACT INFORMATION

Courses Taught

  • Conservation Biology, Fall 2016, 2017
  • Vertebrate Ecology:
    • Herpetology, Fall 2014, 2016, 2018; Ornithology, Fall 2015; Mammalogy, Spring 2015, 2016
  • Biostatistics, Spring 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
  • Natural Resources Inventory: Wildlife, Spring 2018
  • Research Strategy (Quantitative Methods), Summer 2015, 2016, Fall 2018
  • Service Learning Seminar, Fall 2015

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